Cafeteria Democracy

via The West’s ‘double standards’ in Middle East – Opinion – Al Jazeera English.

“We are not only facing a regime and neighbouring powers, but American influence as well. They either do not want to see change or only slight changes that do not give people real democracy because the monarchy might lose power. Everyone sees the US double standards very clearly now. They see Gaddafi hitting people and the US strike back. But here they even bring in foreign armies who don’t believe in democracy and killing people on streets and the US does nothing. It is a big mistake the Americans are making, losing people, losing the faith of the streets.”

The US wants to pick and choose, cafeteria-style, which protests to support and which to ignore.  According to many Middle-Easterners, it does so at the risk of losing the respect of the very people we need to help us fight radical terrorists.

The article points out that by encouraging violent resistance, as opposed to the peaceful protests in Egypt and Yemen, the US may be setting an unfortunate precedent:  more protesters may begin to use violence in Yemen, Syria, and Bahrain.

As it happens, in Bahrain, where the movement refuses to move towards violence so far, things have only gotten worse since the crackdown. Rajab declared with a hint of exasperation:

“More people died and injured. The gap between the ruling elite and the people is getting wider and wider. The government is trying hard to incite sectarianism, frightening both Bahraini Sunnis and neighbouring countries, which is why they sent troops to Bahrain. Indeed, by refusing to take a strong stand, did the US not open the way for the Saudis to take control of the situation for their interests. Look, the Bahrainis could have used their own police, not even the army, just the police, to stop this, because we were peaceful.”

But they brought in the Saudis and GCC specifically to regionalise the conflict and raise the stakes.

Some peaceful protesters also feel they have not gotten the publicity that Egyptians and Tunisians had:

Rajab also feels, as many do many Bahraini pro-democracy and their supporters, that Al Jazeera has not done enough to cover the protests, a dynamic which proved so important in increasing support for protesters in Tunisia and Egypt.

What will happen in the region?  How will the US protect its interest and the fledgling democracy movements as well?

As Syria, Jordan and even Morocco see protests that are turning increasingly deadly, the era of the authoritarian bargain in the Middle East is clearly over.

What replaces it across the region has become the most compelling question in global politics today.

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Violence Intensifies in Ivory Coast

via BBC News – Ivory Coast: Laurent Gbagbo supporters ‘join army’.

Thousands of supporters of Ivory Coast’s disputed President Laurent Gbagbo have gathered at an army base to enlist, amid fears the crisis could destabilise West Africa.

The young activists were heeding a call to join the army from a key ally of Mr Gbagbo, Charles Ble Goude.

He urged them to fight supporters of Alassane Ouattara, widely recognised as the winner of last year’s elections.

The conflict is certain to escalate, and possibly destabilize the whole region.  Refugees are flooding across the border into Liberia, which just ended a civil war.  The needs of the refugees are straining the limited resources of that country.  Other refugees are heading east into Ghana.

Ivory Coast, the world’s largest cocoa producer, used to enjoy the highest living standards in West Africa.

The November election was supposed to reunite it after a 2002-3 civil war but Mr Gbagbo refuses to cede power.

There are 9,000 UN Peacekeepers in Cote d’Ivoire, stationed there to monitor the 2003 cease-fire.  They have been providing security for Mr. Outtara, winner of the November elections.

The UN helped organise the election and says that Mr Ouattara won – a position endorsed by the African Union, which has said Mr Gbagbo should stand down by 24 March.

What happens next?  Most likely more violence, as grown men use the poor to fight for them.

  • 435 killed since disputed election
  • 500,000 forced from their homes
  • 9,000 UN peacekeepers to monitor 2003 ceasefire
  • Election intended to reunite country
  • World’s largest cocoa producer
  • Previously seen as haven of peace and prosperity in West Africa
  • Alassane Ouattara recognised as president-elect
  • International sanctions imposed to force Laurent Gbagbo to go

Up Next – Yemen

via Yemen police massacre 45 protesters | World news | The Guardian

At least 45 people were killed and hundreds of others wounded as security forces and plainclothes government loyalists opened fire on protesters trying to march through the capital, Sana’a.

The youngest and poorest of the Arab world, the country is being racked by protests just like Egypt and Libya.  At the center is Sana’a University, where over 100,000 people marched today after Friday prayers.  It seemed to be a mostly peaceful march, until soldiers and plainclothes police opened fire.

Yemen has a population of  24 million, and a growth rate of 2.6%.   Its GNI PPP per capita is 2,340.  The dictator has been in power for over 3 decades, and is not likely to be moved by protesters.

The intensification of force used against demonstrators has led to concern that protesters will retaliate, threatening the possibility of a broad war that could engulf the country.

“In Yemen, violence is almost always met with more violence. If the regime does not stop these crackdowns immediately then we will soon find ourselves in the throngs of a bloody civil war,” said Mohammed al-Faqih, professor of politics at Sana’a University.

Qaddafi Grounded

 

 

via U.N. Approves Airstrikes Against Libya – NYTimes.com.

The United Nations Security Council voted Thursday to authorize military action, including airstrikes against Libyan tanks and heavy artillery and a no-fly zone, a risky foreign intervention aimed at averting a bloody rout of rebels by forces loyal to Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi.

Russia, China, Germany, Brazil and India abstained from voting, as the US and 10 other nations on the Security Council voted to take “all necessary measures” to protect civilians in Libya.

The US is insisting that the Arab League play a major role in whatever actions are taken in Libya, to avoid the appearance of another Western takeover of an Arab nation.

What will be the outcome?  It’s hard to say:

Diplomats said the specter of former conflicts in Bosnia, Rwanda and Darfur, when a divided and sluggish Security Council was seen to have cost lives, had given a sense of moral urgency to Thursday’s debate. Yet some critics also noted that a no-fly zone authorized in the early 1990s in Bosnia had failed to prevent some of the worst massacres there, including the Srebrenica massacre.

 

 

6 minutes of hell

A Burning Ring of (Nuclear) Fire

 

 

via Ring of fire: the five non-Japan nuclear sites in quake zone – Veracruz, Mexico – CSMonitor.com.

The circle of seismic activity in the Pacific Ocean, known as the “ring of fire,” stretches from Australia to Russia around to Alaska and America’s West Coast and down to Chile in South America. It’s an area responsible for 90 percent of the world’s earthquakes and 75 percent of its volcanoes. So which of the more than 26 nations in the ring has nuclear power?

Read the short article about the non-Japanese nuclear power plants situated in ring-of-fire countries.

 

Mapping Africa

700 years of maps.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

 

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