Black Sea Strategy

Ukraine, Iraq and a Black Sea Strategy | Stratfor.

The most critical issue for the United States is to create a single integrated plan that takes into account the most pressing challenges. Such a plan must begin by defining a theater of operations sufficiently coherent geographically as to permit integrated political maneuvering and military planning. U.S. military doctrine has moved explicitly away from a two-war strategy. Operationally, it might not be possible to engage all adversaries simultaneously, but conceptually, it is essential to think in terms of a coherent center of gravity of operations. For me, it is increasingly clear that that center is the Black Sea.

The Black Sea is the geographical center of the current conflicts.  George Friedman argues that it should be the center of our focus in dealing with the region.

Ukraine, Iraq and a Black Sea Strategy | Stratfor

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Ukraine and the ‘Little Cold War’ | Stratfor

Ukraine and the ‘Little Cold War’ | Stratfor.

Condensed from G. Friedman’s book The Next 100 Years.

The Orange Revolution in Ukraine, from December 2004 to January 2005, was the moment when the post-Cold War world genuinely ended for Russia. The Russians saw the events in Ukraine as an attempt by the United States to draw Ukraine into NATO and thereby set the stage for Russian disintegration.

If the West had succeeded in dominating Ukraine, Russia would have become indefensible. The southern border with Belarus, as well as the southwestern frontier of Russia, would have been wide open. 

 

Read more: Ukraine and the ‘Little Cold War’ | Stratfor

 

Supporting Child Labor?

Are you supporting child labor, conflicts, and environmental degradation when you purchase electronics?

The Price of Precious | PBS NewsHour | Oct. 5, 2013 | PBS.

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